Mindfulness.

Sigmund Freud believed that all psychological problems harked back to an archaic time. Carl Jung believed that ancient history provides humans with archetypes that can be drawn upon to interpret individual lives.  Freud and Jung both believed that the key to solving problems appeared to humans in dreams, drawings and  pictures.  Freud and Jung used drawings of dreams to help their patients understand why they were feeling confused and unwell.      Freud also used a talking cure called psychoanalysis. He treated his patients by asking them to lay on a couch and relax and once they were relaxed he asked them to describe their feelings. While relaxed they could provide the details of their lives without being emotionally overwhelmed by them.  Some of Freud’s patients were beyond speech, but they could draw.   Drawing is a soft entry into the unconscious.

Have you ever doodled with a pen on a piece of paper while holding a conversation on the telephone, or perhaps when you are thinking? You probably believed you were just randomly scribbling, but your brain was working out something way beyond your conscious mind. Our brains often convey thoughts by way of an abstraction or symbols.  Brains are a bit like a kaleidoscope, they store pieces of information in one place and put the pieces together from another area much like doing a jigsaw.  Put simplistically, this is why we often feel confused.   The cure for this is mindfulness.  Art helps to develop mindfulness. One cannot create art without being mindful.